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Posts tagged ‘nanobots’

Where is the Mandela Effect Taking Us?

For everyone aware of the Mandela Effect and reality shifts, it’s clear that experiencers are greatly outnumbered by those who’ve yet to consciously recognize such phenomena. The two surveys that I’ve conducted interviewing hundreds of people in 2000 and again in 2013 indicate that despite some small increases of reported experiences of some types of reality shifts, the percentages of experiencers are roughly similar. Keeping in mind that these two surveys were conducted just 13 years apart, the small increases of some types of reality shifts can conceivably indicate bigger shifts yet to come. Which brings us to ask the question, “Where is the Mandela Effect taking us?”

While we may not know for sure where humanity is headed as some of us come to recognize we are traveling between what seems to be parallel possible worlds–so movie dialogue, product logos, celebrity deaths and much, much more are observed by us to change from time to time–this certainly seems to be a good time to ask ourselves where we’d most like to go.

One thing becomes more certain even as facts and histories become less so, and that is a recognition of human consciousness being capable of moving between physical realities. Thanks to the internet and our ability to quickly communicate with others, we are now finding large numbers of people who may also recall alternate histories to what apparently now ‘has always been this way,’ so we can ask ourselves why, for example, so many of us recall the young blonde character, “Dolly” having braces on her teeth in her scene with “Jaws” from the James Bond movie “Moonraker.” There is no logical reason why so many people would simultaneously be so strongly convinced that there used to be a very logical reason why Dolly and Jaws looked so happy together–they each boasted a mouthful of metal teeth!

Once we begin to notice Mandela Effects in which we can compare notes and observe changes to human anatomy, geography, passages in books we’ve memorized by heart, and more–we also start noticing changes in our personal lives where we might not be able to compare notes with anyone else.

Yet once our eyes have been opened to the fact that we seem to be observing changes in physical reality, we also begin to ask why such changes occur. And this line of questioning can bring us to a place of playing with shifting realities more consciously–with quantum jumping from one reality to the next. We thus can become aware that our beliefs have tremendous power and influence over what physically happens in our lives, and we notice how the placebo effect has doubled in the past 30 years, and people who have some kind of faith tend to experience the most profound placebo benefits–feeling better when having taken some kind of “sham” treatment with no known medical efficacy.

Alexander Lvovsky

If it turns out to be true that there is no boundary line demarcating the end of the classical physics world and the beginning of the ‘quantum realm’ as some scientists such as Alexander Lvovsky are recently contemplating, we begin to see what the Mandela Effect and reality shifts and quantum jumps are telling us, and where they may be taking us, too.

We begin to imagine there’s continuity from the realm of the very smallest subatomic particles and quantum wave functions that behave more like energy than matter–all the way to the realm of the immensely, gigantically enormously huge star systems, galaxies, and constellations. Relativity may then apply both to spaceship travelers and quantum measurements and ‘quantum phenomena’–such as teleportation, tunneling, entanglement, and superposition of states–such that we can reach a point of expecting histories to change from time to time as consciousness (individual and/or larger group levels) makes various levels of leaps.

The Mandela Effect offers to take humanity out of our current tendencies toward presumption of material realism and classical True-False logic into the realm of quantum logic, where facts are entangled and sometimes seemingly unrelated things move together coherently, like birds of a flock moving in perfect synchrony. Quantum logic invites us to consider how something can be: True, True-and-False, Not-True-Not-False, or False. Mandela Effects, reality shifts and quantum jumps show us that just because we think something is a certain way doesn’t mean it will stay that way, or that others will believe that they have experienced it that way. We’ll thus begin to formulate an explanation for why scientists are currently having such trouble replicating their experiments. We’ll begin to transform our legal systems as historians, psychologists, sociologists, anthropologists and biologists come to recognize alternate histories as being a natural part of human existence. Medical professionals will adopt a view of spontaneous remission being a naturally occurring process, and doctors will therefore encourage people to adopt ‘healthy beliefs’ and states of mind that facilitate quantum jumps as one of the fundamental foundations of healing. Our views of unbiased observers and impartial judges will be completely changed, as we appreciate how information can travel anywhere instantaneously, and how everyone and everything is interconnected.

The ultimate destination for humanity may be unknown, in terms of just how radically we may eventually be capable of evolving ourselves and our environment as we master our mind-body-spirit connection with the physical world. Yet we can be relatively certain that as long as we keep asking questions such as, “How good can it get?!”, we likely have a wonderful future to look forward to!

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QuantumJumps300x150adCynthia Sue Larson is the best-selling author of six books, including Quantum Jumps. Cynthia has a degree in Physics from UC Berkeley, and discusses consciousness and quantum physics on numerous shows including the History Channel, Coast to Coast AM, the BBC and One World with Deepak Chopra and on the Living the Quantum Dream show she hosts. You can subscribe to Cynthia’s free monthly ezine at: http://www.RealityShifters.com
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Many Possible Realities and Mandela Effect

When I first began studying the field of quantum jumping, reality shifts, and the Mandela Effect back in the 1990s, I was noticing things appearing, disappearing, transforming, and transporting–and the only thing that matched the kind of bizarre stuff I was seeing was to consider the radical viewpoint that maybe quantum behavior doesn’t just happen in the so called “quantum realm.” I’ve been presenting the viewpoint in my books Reality Shifts and Quantum Jumps that maybe there is no ‘quantum realm.’ Maybe everything is essentially quantum, and we usually just don’t notice it.

While it may seem bizarre to imagine that you and I and everyone and everything exists in what can be described as a ‘superposition of states,’ a growing number of physicists believes that this is precisely what is going on. So, rather than there just being one ‘true reality’ at any given moment, we can imagine that each moment consists of an infinite range of possibilities, with many possible me’s and many possible you’s.

This idea of existing in a superposition of states with many possible variations of ourselves and everyone and everything else around us is precisely the idea behind why placebos have become so remarkably effective in recent years. Many scientists have noted with wonderment that efficacy of placebos–which can be like a saline solution, sugar pill, or ‘sham’ surgery–has doubled over the past few decades. Many people can even feel the benefit from telling themselves, for example, that they got a good night’s sleep, even if in truth it was one of the most interrupted nights of sleep they’ve ever had, and astonishingly they will respond on cognitive and motor skill tests just as well as if they really did get a good night’s sleep.

The Placebo Effect thus shows us how we can access the realm of alternative possible realities, by doing what American psychologist William James suggested, and acting as if we’re in the reality we require. So you can, for example, simply tell yourself that you’ve had a good night’s sleep, and connect with the reality in which that was in fact true. And you can feel well-rested, just as if you actually did get one of your best night’s of sleep ever.

Scientific evidence for the existence of such things as ‘placebo sleep’ and ‘placebo exercise’ have been proven true in recent years, in studies such as Placebo Sleep Affects Cognitive Functioning. A study of hotel housekeepers who were informed that doing their regular work activities was good exercise found that those workers scored higher on health indicators than a group of similar workers who had not been told they were getting on-the-job work-outs.

What’s being found to be consistently proven true is that any time people are informed by someone they respect that some kind of “treatment” is going to work, it probably will. I include summaries of numerous such studies in my book, Quantum Jumps, along with laboratory-proven simple things you can do to feel reduced pain, greater intellectual ability, improved willpower, and better relationships.

You can see the video summary of this blog post at: https://youtu.be/AVIZM–qQQg

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QuantumJumps300x150adCynthia Sue Larson is the best-selling author of six books, including Quantum Jumps. Cynthia has a degree in Physics from UC Berkeley, and discusses consciousness and quantum physics on numerous shows including the History Channel, Coast to Coast AM, the BBC and One World with Deepak Chopra and on the Living the Quantum Dream show she hosts. You can subscribe to Cynthia’s free monthly ezine at: http://www.RealityShifters.com
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Neurotechnology, AI and Enhanced Human Intelligence

David Eagleman and Cynthia Sue Larson

David Eagleman and Cynthia Sue Larson

I attended an invigorating open discussion, “The Future of Neurotechnology: Human Intelligence + Artificial Intelligence,” led by neuroscientist David Eagleman and entrepreneur Bryan Johnson at my alma mater, UC Berkeley. The purpose of this talk was to discuss possible directions as we go forward to incorporate advances in neuroscience with those of Artificial Intelligence (AI), with awareness that there will be some degree of synergy between development of advances in human cognitive enhancement and AI.

Eagleman and Johnson agree that it’s not a matter of IF but WHEN neurotechnology will become reality in our lives. Neuro-tech may not yet be a common household word just yet, but it is definitely well on the way. And in fact, now that most of us hold in our hands devices that allow us to access the internet, we already are starting to get a glimpse of how this merging of technology into the way we make choices, communicate, and remember important people and events in our life will feel.

At this time when venture capitalists are understandably wary about investing in businesses with unproven track records that are operating on the “bleeding edge,” Bryan Johnson explained he invested one hundred million dollars of his own personal money in his company, Kernel, a human intelligence (HI) company to develop the world’s first neuroprosthesis for cognition. Working together with Ted Berger at USC, Johnson is exploring how new technologies might help us improve memory through neuromodulation. Johnson and his team seek to answer the question, “What if we could read and write neural memory in the hippocampus?”

neuropaceIn 2013, Kernel’s NeuroPace proved itself to be a commercial success in quelling epileptic seizures. Future advancements may rely upon such new technologies as neural dust and nanobots.

What does all this have to do with you? In much the same way that transportation is being revolutionized with the coming of robot cars and self-driving vehicles, neurotechnology is poised to transform Human Intelligence (HI) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), while reducing disease, dysfunction and degradation–and enhancing human cognitive functioning.

Neurotechnology Ethical Considerations

Bryan Johnson noted that several people were raising questions and voicing concerns about ethical considerations of human cognitive enhancement–so he asked for a show of hands to indicate how many people felt ethics should be given high priority with regard to neurotechnological advances. Many people (including me) raised our hands, confirming Bryan Johnson’s hunch.

Johnson took note of this, and pointed out that however each of us might feel about the ethical questions involving applying neurotechnology with such things as neural dust–designed to non-invasively enter a human’s peripheral nervous system and sit on the surface of the neurocortex–there will be countries in the world, such as China, that welcome such experimental research with open arms.

The subject of the singularity came up, as one gentleman shared the observation that based on simulations of what happens when AI develops, it appears to be extremely clear that we will need some kind of human enhancement in order to give humans a fighting chance. A variety of simulations of how AI will interact with humanity show that unless everything goes just exactly right, human survival after the creation, expansion, development, and dominance of AI is not a sure thing. We would thus do well to help ensure a more level playing field between humans and AI by boosting Human Intelligence with neurotechnology.

Participants in the discussion voiced the opinion that convergence between machine learning and human cognitive enhancement will be helpful now. One woman in the audience expressed her profound heartfelt desire that wisdom be prioritized in neurotechnological advances as being one of the most important priorities to keep in mind.

nanobotswarmEnvisioning New Neurotechnical Horizons

With regard to envisioning where neurotechnology may go in the next few decades, Johnson and Eagleman spoke mostly in generalities, rather than specifics. Intelligent neural dust, such as that developed at UC Berkeley’s Brain Machine Interface Systems Laboratory involving sensors about the size of a grain of sand, is a form of implantable technology that can be placed in nerves or muscles to treat disorders such as epilepsy, to stimulate the immune system, and to reduce inflammation. Powered by and working with ultrasound, the tiny neural dust can go super-deep inside a body to take measurements and assist in stimulating nerves and muscles. Another new arrival in the new field of electroceuticals will be nanobots, which will be even smaller than neural dust, and can automate tasks such as performing delicate surgical procedures, delivering exact drug dosages, and diagnosing disease; this past year, swarms of nanobots demonstrated promise in precisely targeting and treating cancer.

Job requirements may change once human intelligence and cognitive functioning is neurotechnologically enhanced. We expect that some of our technical professionals receive additional training to become doctors and lawyers–and it’s conceivable that in the not-too-distant future, some professionals may also be expected to undergo neurotechnological enhancement as part of the requirements for the job.

A young man wearing a T-shirt emblazoned “Qualia Research Institute” asked, “What do we do if we find out we are at the local maxima of human cognitive efficiency? How might we be able to tweak it?” to which Johnson and Eagleman pointed out that we should be able to increase our communication input/output rate to a level that is far faster than the slow verbal speech method currently being used during this discussion–since we can all think far more quickly than we can talk.

Fully aware of the irony, I took hand-written notes during this presentation and discussion, and wrote the draft of this article by hand with a pen on paper–clearly NOT the fastest way to do things! Yet, I’ve seen research showing advantages of taking notes by hand, rather than typing things on keyboards. I’ve found my ability to remember and more completely utilize information gets a huge boost when I work from hand-written notes. So while I agree with the inevitability of human enhancement with neurotechnology, I also envision a future in which “old ways” of knowing, communicating, and interacting with others continues to take place, and might even help us ensure that during the coming ascendance of AI, human intelligence ensures its place, too.

incognitoFree Will and the Power to Forget

After the talk, I enjoyed a personal chat with David Eagleman. During their discussion, Eagleman and Johnson had been emphasizing the value of enhancing human intelligence with better memory–and I had a sense that while memory enhancement sounds like a great idea, there are likely some really good natural reasons that we humans so often forget. I pointed out the value of forgetting–in that forgetting can enable us to make quantum jumps to more optimal realities–and this is likely a big factor in the effectiveness of placebo effect healing.

I talked with Eagleman about how he and Johnson had discussed finding ways for neurotechnology to enhance cognitive functioning by reading and writing information to the hippocampus–pointing out that we’ll likely see the that the hippocampus will grow when written to.

I voiced my support for putting human intelligence in the Open AI project, to minimize and prevent attempts to control AI and HI by one or a few governments or corporations.

We ended our conversation discussing ‘free will,’ which David reminded me he does not believe in, per se, as he describes in his book, Incognito. I suggested he consider the work of Thomas Metzinger and Max Velmans with consideration of first person and third person levels of representational self-modeling and levels of awareness. It’s clear that systems that are missing a few lines of code that constantly remind them they are representational models bear more than passing similarity to humans.

I’m inspired to see that David Eagleman’s Laboratory for Perception and Action at Stanford University seeks to understand how the brain constructs perception, how different brains do so differently, and how this matters for society–with special focus in four specific areas of: time perception, sensory substitution, synesthesia, and neurolaw. After giving some thought to neurotechnology, it’s clear to see the growing significance of the emerging interdisciplinary field of neurolaw.

Join the Conversation

My personal bias involves a preference to explore strengthening my awareness of what consciousness is and how it operates, working with natural human abilities that have historically been neglected, ignored or forgotten as technology has advanced. Some of my bias may be due to my being what is called an “exceptional human experiencer,” since I am a near-death experiencer, I am a meditator, I am a lucid dreamer, I have had a kundalini awakening experience, and I was ‘born aware’ (meaning I remembered being conscious prior to being born). Exceptional human experiences can provide people with access to heightened abilities to do some of the things we might also hope to enhance through neurotechnology–and I see a study of neurotechnology as potentially providing us with greater insights into optimizing our natural human abilities.

I’d love to hear your comments, thoughts and feelings about the future of neurotechnology. This is a controversial topic, that I hope you will contemplate and talk to people about it, thus helping set the direction for how humanity continues to evolve with technology. Some people are understandably skeptical or concerned about neurotechnology, while others are excited about the possibilities, and others yet don’t yet have strong feelings one way or the other. My gut feeling is that AI is coming, as is human cognitive enhancement. Humanity will do well to envision how we see ourselves in the future, and what we consider optimal in terms of working with neurotechnology in the future. I tend to agree with Eagleman and Johnson that it’s not a matter of if, but when, this technology will arrive. And those of us like myself who still don’t yet have cell phones can be hold-outs for a while (or in my case now, decades), yet all of us will eventually be affected in some way by these technologies.

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QuantumJumps300x150adCynthia Sue Larson is the best-selling author of six books, including Quantum Jumps. Cynthia has a degree in Physics from UC Berkeley, and discusses consciousness and quantum physics on numerous shows including the History Channel, Coast to Coast AM, the BBC and One World with Deepak Chopra and on the Living the Quantum Dream show she hosts. You can subscribe to Cynthia’s free monthly ezine at: http://www.RealityShifters.com
RealityShifters®

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